Principal Investigators

Prof. Teresa Head-Gordon

Prof. Teresa Head-Gordon

Email: thg [at] berkeley [dot] edu
Phone: (510) 666-2744
Office: 274C Stanley Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720-3220
Website
Professor Teresa Head-Gordon is Chancellor’s Professor in the departments of Chemistry, Bioengineering, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. In 2001 she received and IBM-SUR Award for Research in Computational Biology, and in 2005-2006 she was the Schlumberger Fellow at Cambridge University, U.K. Her research program encompasses the development of general computational methodologies applied to chemistry and biophysics, and these methods have been integrated into widely used community codes such as APBS and Charmm. She has also been involved in local and national service, education, and training, which extends to promoting and developing the blueprint for computational science and engineering for the future.
Prof. Martin Head-Gordon
Prof. Martin Head-Gordon

Email: mhg [at] cchem [dot] berkeley [dot] edu
Phone: (510) 642-5957
Office: 217 Gilman Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3220
Website
Professor Martin Head-Gordon is the Kenneth S. Pitzer Distinguished Professor of Chemistry. He was an NSF Young Investigator, Joel H. Hildebrand Professor, Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, and David and Lucile Packard Fellow (1995-2000). He received the Medal of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences in 1998. His research group performs research on the development and application of electronic structure theories by combining fundamental quantum mechanics and many-body theory with aspects of applied mathematics and numerical analysis, as well as high performance computing
Prof. Dan Neumark
Prof. Dan Neumark

Email: dneumark [at] berkeley [dot] edu
Phone: (510) 642-3502
Office: B64 Hildebrand Hall,
Berkeley, CA 94720-3220
Website
Prof. Neumark is best known for experiments in which he used negative ion photodetachment to probe and characterize the transition state of chemical reactions, and for the development of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received the ACS Nobel Laureate Signature Award (with Martin Zanni), the Bomem-Michelson Award, the William F. Meggers Award, the Irving Langmuir Award, and the Herschbach Medal. He was Director of the Chemical Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from 2000-2010. He has been the Chair of the Chemistry Department at Berkeley.
Prof. Rich Saykally
Prof. Rich Saykally

Email: saykally [at] berkeley [dot] edu
Phone: (510) 642-8269
Office: D33 Hildebrand Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3220
Website
Richard Saykally is the Class of 1932 Endowed Professor at the University of California-Berkeley. Born in Rhinelander, Wisconsin and educated at UW-Eau Claire and UW-Madison, Saykally has been a professor at the University of California, Berkeley since 1979. He and his students have pioneered many important advances in spectroscopy, including velocity modulation spectroscopy of ions, terahertz laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of clusters, infrared photon counting spectroscopy, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and X-ray spectroscopy of liquid microjets. A co-author of over 400 publications that have been cited nearly 30,000 times (H index > 80), the recipient of over 70 honors and awards from 9 different countries, Saykally is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has recently received the E.O. Lawrence Award in Chemistry from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Hinshelwood Lectureship from Oxford University, the Inaugural International Solvay Chair in Chemistry from the Solvay Institutes of Belgium, the Peter DeBye Award in Physical Chemistry from the ACS, the J.C. Bose Lectureship from IACS-Kolkata, and the Faraday Lectureship Prize from the UK Royal Society of Chemistry. He is a UC-Berkeley Distinguished Teacher, and has been active at the national level in science education. Over 150 students and postdocs have trained under his direction, many of whom hold prominent positions in academic, government, and industrial institutions.
Prof. Evan Williams
Prof. Evan Williams

Email: williams [at] cchem [dot] berkeley [dot] edu
Phone: (510) 643-7161
Address: B42 Hildebrand Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3220
Website
Professor Evan Williams is a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley.
He also serves as Associate Director of the Center for Analytical Biotechnology, as Faculty Director of the QB3/Chemistry Mass Spectrometry Center, and holds a joint appointment in the Earth Sciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Throughout his career, Prof. Williams has received numerous awards and honors, including the Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh Award in 1992, an American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award in 1994, and an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award in 1999. He was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2012. He has also served on numerous advisory boards, including the Editorial Board of the Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2001–2007), and is currently an Associate Editor for the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Analyst. He was Vice-Chair and Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Gaseous Ions in 2011 and 2013, and served from 2011-2013 as Member-at-Large for Publications on the Board of Directors of the ASMS.
Prof. Williams has been awarded the 2014 Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry
for his ‘development of mass spectrometric methods for molecular structural analysis and their application to fundamental problems in chemistry and biochemistry.’
The focus of the Williams’ research group is the development and application of novel instrumental and computational techniques in mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, separations, and laser spectroscopy to solve problems of fundamental interest in chemistry and biochemistry.